What is a "Sale-Leaseback"?

Simply stated, a Sale-Leaseback is when the current business which occupies a property, sells the property to an investor and remains as the tenant and continues their business operations. This is not some mystical, unheard of sleight-of-hand. Corporations of all size use this tactic, such as CVS Pharmacy, Walgreens, Starbucks, McDonald's, and Home Depot.  A typical development model for such companies is to seek out, purchase and develop specific properties for their own business operations. The newly-built and occupied property is now offered-up to investors as a Sale-Leaseback, offering favorable lease terms, and freeing up capital for the company to “Rinse and Repeat”. It is also not unusual for major corporations to sell, then leaseback their own corporate offices.

There are definite advantages to be learned from tax accountants and financiers in this business model.

Could a Sale-Leaseback Benefit You?

There are numerous advantages to a Sale-Leaseback from both the perspective of an Investor/Buyer and for the Owner/Seller.

Following is a guide offering both sides.

As the Owner/Seller of the property:

Are you a good candidate for a Sale-Leaseback?

  • Could your business, or you personally (if you are the owner) make good use of the funds which would be freed-up from the sale of the property?
  • Most property types are appropriate for a Sale-Leaseback, such as medical, office, retail, and industrial. Being honest with yourself, is your property desirable to investors?
  • Do you have a solid operating history, and a healthy balance sheet? In other words, are you a good credit risk?
  • Would you be willing to commit to a lease of at least ten years at the current market rate? Keep in mind; the final terms of the lease are negotiated simultaneously with the terms of the sale. Therefore, ten years is a “typical” length of time.
  • Would you be willing to commit to a triple net lease (often referred to as a “NNN Lease”) which would say that you agree to being responsible for any and all operating expenses and repairs/improvements. In reality, as the current owner you are already in this situation, so this part does not change. Again, keep in mind; the final terms of the lease are negotiated simultaneously with the terms of the sale. Therefore, ten years, and the specific terms are used as an example.

As the Investor/Buyer of the property:

  • Are you able and willing to commit funds on a long-term basis to a property which should not expect a turnover of its tenant?
  • Most property types are appropriate for a Sale-Leaseback, such as medical, office, retail, and industrial. Do these property and business-types match your portfolio goals and needs?
  • Would you be willing to commit to a lease of at least ten years at the current market rate? Keep in mind; the final terms of the lease are negotiated simultaneously with the terms of the sale. Therefore, ten years is a “typical” length of time.
  • Would you be willing to commit to a triple net lease (often referred to as a “NNN Lease”) which would say that you agree to the tenant being responsible for any and all operating expenses and repairs/improvements. Again, keep in mind; the final terms of the lease are negotiated simultaneously with the terms of the sale. Therefore, ten years, and the specific terms are used as an example.

Contact us to discuss how a Sale-Leaseback might benefit you

email: Steve@SteveHerb.com

Phone: 740-334-1018